Delegation

Moses had left his wife and sons with his father-in-law Jethro while he had been in Egypt. Reading in Exodus 18, we get the impression that Moses had great respect for his father-in-law. When the Israelites were camped nearby, Jethro was determined to see Moses so he brought his daughter and the two sons with him to see Moses. It was a very happy occasion as Moses was glad to be reunited with his wife, children, and father-in-law.

There were over 600,000 men with their wives and families who were uprooted from their home and traveling through the desert. Many disputes had to be dealt with and Moses shared with his father-in-law about serving as judge for these people. Jethro was concerned that this would put too much of a strain on Moses so he suggested that Moses appoint a group of trustworthy helpers to serve as judges. Moses took his father-in law’s advice and decided to delegate the simple cases. This freed up more time to spend on the more complicated cases.

Image Source

Lord, as we take on more responsibility, sometimes we get overwhelmed with work and in the passage today, a lesson has been learned about delegation. Many people working together is better than just one person because there is greater creativity, stability, and durability. Thank You Lord for great people that we can surround ourselves with and can count on to help handle the challenges we face throughout life. Amen.

Advertisements

About Mark Shields

Mark volunteers as a member of the media ministry team at his church. A few years ago, he started an on-line Bible study guide called “This Day with God Devotional”. He uses this as a tool in his journey through the Bible. We live in a very busy world with busy schedules so this tool has helped him continue with daily Bible reading and study. Each of the studies are designed to help apply our faith in the work place, at school, or at home. Join him on this journey or check in every so often to read his thoughts.
This entry was posted in Bible Study, Budget Time and Money and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s